The Roller Coaster Ride That Never Ends…

How many parents haven’t agreed to ride the roller coaster at least once with their kids?  It’s almost a “right of passage” – sitting for 3 minutes on a ride that you can’t wait to end.  Yet riding the roller coaster at an amusement park doesn’t come close to the other roller coaster ride – the one that parents can’t get off because it simply doesn’t end.

I can count on two hands the number of days school has been in session yet would need my hands and toes plus those of others to count some of what I’ve already been told…

  • My child’s teacher refuses to allow my son to have a midday snack even though it’s on his IEP and has been documented by medical need.
  • We explained that my daughter needs extra time to transition from class to class and it’s in her IEP, yet we’ve already received a note saying that she’s been late for class several times.
  • Even though my child’s IEP states that homework will be limited to 30 minutes per night, we’re already spending double that amount of time and behaviors are starting.

Yes..it’s the start of a new school year.  New backpacks.  New classmates.  And a host of new issues that often combine with those carried over from last year.  If your child is in special education, you know well that this ride is anything but short and you won’t be on solid ground for a while.

Added to the challenges that inherently accompany having a child with autism, ADD/ADHD, or a learning disability comes slashed budgets, larger class sizes particularly if your child is in a regular education classroom, and fewer resources.  Districts are stretched thin and so are teachers.  Yet the reality is that it’s the parents who are feeling the strain and the children are already showing it.

Every school year begins with the hope that it will be a good one.  That services will be provided, supports will be in place, compliance with IEPs will occur, and collaboration will be the approach.  And for many parents, this is indeed how this and every school year begins.  Yet for many others, it’s anything but.

A few things to ease the mounting pressure:

  • If your child is already showing signs that things are not working, reconvene your IEP team now.  It should be routine that, depending upon how your child is doing “out of the gate,” you convene in September or early October.  Remember that you can call an IEP meeting at any time so don’t wait.
  • If your child made progress or regressed over the summer, bring this information and data to your IEP team meeting.  It’s essential that everyone involved in teaching and supporting your child knows what has happened from June through September.
  • If your child has been evaluated or re-evaluated over the summer and you agree with the findings, provide a copy of this report to your district before heading into an IEP meeting.  You want to give them sufficient time to review the documentation so that you’re all on the “same page” during your discussions.

And the most important piece of guidance is this – your child is continually changing and as such, your child’s IEP may need to change as well.  If you developed this year’s IEP last year, think about the weeks and months that have passed in the meantime.  Things that may have appeared appropriate in March may well be different in September.

If you have not been keeping notes at home, do so.  Your observations and data factor into your child’s educational plan so be sure you’re watching, listening, and recording things as the school year unfolds.  Document all conversations with school district staff – no “off the cuff” discussions apply.

Your child’s greatest resource is you.  Pace yourself.  Be proactive.  Focus on collaboration.  And don’t be afraid to ask the tough questions or to bring in outside support if needed.   I read a great business quote that certainly applies here too — “What you want, you will get.  But you have to want it enough to go about getting it.”

Leveling The Playing Field

Parents of high school kids know … it’s SAT and ACT season again.  Stress is on overdrive as everyone is striving for ways to improve scores – tutoring, prep classes, working through the huge practice books at home.  All eyes are focused on the thrill of receipt – opening the mail to find those glorious oversized packages with writing on the outside that says “You’re accepted” or “Welcome.”  Believe me, I’ve been there with my own child so understand it well.

I just read an article in The New York Times entitled, “It Takes A B.A. To Find A Job As A File Clerk” which focuses on an Atlanta law firm that requires every employee – including the in-house courier making $10/hour – to have a bachelor’s degree.  The firm’s managing partner said that this requirement shows that every employee has made “a commitment” to their future and not just a paycheck.  Sounds reasonable since college is really about honing skills needed in most every line of employment – organization, planning, meeting deadlines, self-discipline, flexibility, and teamwork.

But here’s the problem with requiring all employees to have a degree – there’s a big difference between equal and fair.  Equal means the same but fair means, well, fair.  Respecting and supporting individual differences and recognizing that not everyone fits into the same box.  It means understanding that a 5th Grade child with dyslexia reading from a 3rd Grade book and receiving an “A” on an assignment is fair even if others are reading from the 5th Grade text.  That a college student who requires extra time and a quiet room to complete an exam is fair even if others are taking the same in a lecture hall with 150 other students.  It’s about evaluating each person as an individual and on their own merits vs. expecting the same for all.  This “life lesson” begins in school and since school is about preparing children for life, shouldn’t the same principle apply to the workplace as well?

Expecting every employee to hold a B.A. in order to secure employment means that many bright, capable, and talented young people will be overlooked.   Believe me, I’m a huge proponent of college and helping all students receive their degree, yet not everyone can reach this milestone.  For some it’s financial.  For others it’s access.  No matter the reason, it’s unfair and unreasonable to assume that the reason a young person does not hold an undergraduate degree is because they don’t aspire for success or don’t want to invest in themselves.

There are many students with learning differences, Asperger’s Syndrome, or ADD – with amazing skills and who would be top performers in the workplace – who are unable to navigate the complexities of college.  Maybe they tried but it didn’t work.  Maybe they were told to not even consider college as an option.  Regardless of the reason, concluding that a young person without a B.A. is only focused on a paycheck is an arbitrary measure and one that places barriers where, in all likelihood, enormous barriers already exist.  And this includes even when, according to a recruiter referenced in the same article, 800 resumes are received for one job.

We all know people sans a college degree who have made contributions to every area of life – business, the arts, philanthropy, many achieving far more success (recognizing that success is subjective) than those with B.A.’s.  And this certainly includes many with learning or similar differences for whom their commitment to themselves is defined by the struggles they have endured and their “never give up” attitude to forge ahead.  College is wonderful, no doubt, yet self-respect and self-worth trumps it every time.  There’s a reason it’s called a playing field and not a playing box.  Fields are larger and allow for many to play.  Whether school, employment, or life, the larger the field the better.