Parents, Children, Autism, and Unconditional Love

Let me start by saying that I’m not a psychologist, sociologist, or expert on love.  I am, however, a parent and as such, have filled these roles and many more in the two decades since I went from being “me” to “we.”

Andrew Solomon’s recently posted TED talk – “Love, no matter what” on parenting, children, differences, and unconditional love struck a number of chords.  How we need to embrace our children and their differences and how unconditional love means doing just this.  He spoke of the changes we as a society have undergone in terms of understanding and accepting our gay children, our children with Down’s Syndrome, and our children with other differences and disabilities.  And while I agreed with much of his talk, there were two points of fairly strong disagreement, one of which follows.

Solomon stated that parents of children with autism who wish that their children did not have this diagnosis somehow fail the litmus test of unconditional love.  What?  Parents of autistic children don’t love their children unconditionally?  Say it wasn’t what he said.  But it was.

On my soapbox I climb once again to say… No parents understand the definition of unconditional love like parents of children with autism.

I don’t need to revisit again what I’ve expressed so many times before…the hours, sacrifices, work/life conflicts, financial strain, family upheaval…all the things that define parenting children, teens, and young adults in a world where they struggle at best to meet its demands.  But I do need to ensure that anyone who may not understand why parents would “wish” their children did not have this diagnosis, understands it now.

Parents of autistic children see their children’s struggles every day in ways that clinicians, teachers, and others cannot.  They see them from sunrise to sunset.  They know that the weather, clothing, food, sounds, movement, people, activities, environments, and a host of other day-to-day situations create chaos for their children.  Does anyone think these parents may “wish” this wasn’t the case for their children?  Does anyone think these parents may “wish” their children had friends?  Could speak?  Could drive?  Live independently?  Work?

If parents of children with autism wish anything, it’s that their children did not have these struggles or needs.  They wish for anything – something – to lessen their children’s pain.  But the wishing has nothing whatsoever to do with love.  And certainly not unconditional love.  Parents of children with autism *define* unconditional love and epitomize what this truly means.  They could also teach a lesson or two to many other parents as well.

We all wish for things.   For life to be easier.  For money to be more.  For family to be well.  And yes, parents of children with autism do wish for things too.  That their 4th Grader would be invited to a classmate’s birthday party.  That their 8th Grader would be asked to be in the science club.  That their 12th Grader would be able to attend college.  But the one wish they don’t have is wishing that their children were different so their love for them would then be without restrictions or caveats.

It’s this type of unconditional love that keeps parents of children with autism forging ahead, plowing through the difficulties, never taking “no” for an answer, exploring supports wide and far.  If wishing comes into play here at all, it’s that these parents wish that their children may have every opportunity to live a life where *their* wishes can come true.  And their shot at doing so rests firmly on the shoulders of their parents who love them unconditionally.

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