Required, Desired…Enough With Semantics. It’s Needed

I know…school’s out so who wants to think about it right now.  But here’s the thing – there’s a situation impacting millions of children and their ability to succeed in school.  And the implications go beyond high school graduation.  Many parents understand it, yet many are struggling to get beyond it.

Decisions are being made by schools every day about whether a child should receive “x” service or support that they clearly need based upon whether someone believes it’s “required” or “desired.”   And I’m not talking here about what special education laws or IEPs dictate.

Let’s take tutoring over the summer, for example, when a child is struggling with reading.  Many schools (but not all) would say that it’s required because they’re accountable, particularly if the child has an IEP, for helping the child read at grade level.  So many schools provide this support.  Now let’s look at social issues – e.g. the ability to have a conversation with a peer or the ability to interpret non-verbal cues.  Many would say that this is less of a necessity (i.e. it’s not required) so no need to address it over the summer…or even during the school year.

Not a week goes by when a parent doesn’t ask me this question – “Can we put social skills on our child’s IEP?”   Somehow the message that academics are the only thing that matters remains pervasive even though anyone would say that living in a social world requires social skills and understanding.  It seems as though being able to read a college syllabus (certainly important) trumps being able to work on a team.  Since when?

We tend to categorize things in order to prioritize them – the basics before the flourishes.  The problem here is that the scale of priorities is painfully out of whack.  Schools are making decisions about what they believe are the “must have” vs.  “nice to have” skills with little grasp of the long-term ramifications of *not* developing skills that they see as less than critical.

Ranking academics above other skills using a “required or desired” model is failing students miserably, as it ignores the needs of many children in their quest for success in school and beyond.  And when a parent asks if social skills can be included on their child’s IEP, it conveys plenty about the information they lack or the misinformation they’re receiving.

I doubt that anyone would want a child to be unable to meet tomorrow’s expectations in college or on the job because those who weren’t looking or thinking ahead decided what was required.  Parents know, yet they are often ignored when these critical decisions are made.

Many struggling children grow into struggling adults.  And if the purpose of school is to prepare children for adulthood, we’re failing them in this regard.  Forget the semantics.  If we want our struggling children to be ready to transition out of high school and into the “real world,”  it’s time to see their needs today and plan for tomorrow.

Parents, Children, Autism, and Unconditional Love

Let me start by saying that I’m not a psychologist, sociologist, or expert on love.  I am, however, a parent and as such, have filled these roles and many more in the two decades since I went from being “me” to “we.”

Andrew Solomon’s recently posted TED talk – “Love, no matter what” on parenting, children, differences, and unconditional love struck a number of chords.  How we need to embrace our children and their differences and how unconditional love means doing just this.  He spoke of the changes we as a society have undergone in terms of understanding and accepting our gay children, our children with Down’s Syndrome, and our children with other differences and disabilities.  And while I agreed with much of his talk, there were two points of fairly strong disagreement, one of which follows.

Solomon stated that parents of children with autism who wish that their children did not have this diagnosis somehow fail the litmus test of unconditional love.  What?  Parents of autistic children don’t love their children unconditionally?  Say it wasn’t what he said.  But it was.

On my soapbox I climb once again to say… No parents understand the definition of unconditional love like parents of children with autism.

I don’t need to revisit again what I’ve expressed so many times before…the hours, sacrifices, work/life conflicts, financial strain, family upheaval…all the things that define parenting children, teens, and young adults in a world where they struggle at best to meet its demands.  But I do need to ensure that anyone who may not understand why parents would “wish” their children did not have this diagnosis, understands it now.

Parents of autistic children see their children’s struggles every day in ways that clinicians, teachers, and others cannot.  They see them from sunrise to sunset.  They know that the weather, clothing, food, sounds, movement, people, activities, environments, and a host of other day-to-day situations create chaos for their children.  Does anyone think these parents may “wish” this wasn’t the case for their children?  Does anyone think these parents may “wish” their children had friends?  Could speak?  Could drive?  Live independently?  Work?

If parents of children with autism wish anything, it’s that their children did not have these struggles or needs.  They wish for anything – something – to lessen their children’s pain.  But the wishing has nothing whatsoever to do with love.  And certainly not unconditional love.  Parents of children with autism *define* unconditional love and epitomize what this truly means.  They could also teach a lesson or two to many other parents as well.

We all wish for things.   For life to be easier.  For money to be more.  For family to be well.  And yes, parents of children with autism do wish for things too.  That their 4th Grader would be invited to a classmate’s birthday party.  That their 8th Grader would be asked to be in the science club.  That their 12th Grader would be able to attend college.  But the one wish they don’t have is wishing that their children were different so their love for them would then be without restrictions or caveats.

It’s this type of unconditional love that keeps parents of children with autism forging ahead, plowing through the difficulties, never taking “no” for an answer, exploring supports wide and far.  If wishing comes into play here at all, it’s that these parents wish that their children may have every opportunity to live a life where *their* wishes can come true.  And their shot at doing so rests firmly on the shoulders of their parents who love them unconditionally.