Beating The Drum A Bit More…Telecommuting, Etc.

For the past few weeks, everyone has been either talking or reading about Marissa Mayer’s decision to end telecommuting for Yahoo employees.  I’ve read just about every viewpoint – those who support it, those who vehemently disagree with it, those who believe it’s smart business, those who are waiting for Mayer to realize the error of her ways.

I’ve already made my perspectives clear on it – it’s a bad business decision, the impact of which go beyond the in-house fallout and anticipated revolving door of exit interviews (if Yahoo even cares to listen) to broader concerns about how the CEO world is going to react/respond.  No question this is a major blow to the years of progress made in the workplace flexibility arena.  But there’s a little more to be said.

I just read a 2011 Forbes article  – “What Employees Want More Than A Raise,” which reviewed the top drivers of retention.  Care to guess one which was at the top of the list?  Respect.  Hum … respect.  Let’s see…

  • Can a company be viewed as “respecting” its employees if their diverse needs and complicated work/life balance issues are ignored…or worse, shoved aside entirely?
  • Can a company support any contention that it “respects” its employees if management institutes mandates (i.e. you will be at your desk every day at 9:00 a.m.) vs. opening up for discussion – yes, across the organization – operational changes being evaluated (i.e. we’re exploring ways to modify our telecommuting policies and are asking for your input)?
  • Can a company view themselves as “respecting” the manager/employee relationship when decisions are made based upon explanations (i.e. the need for communication and collaboration) that simply don’t add up?

It’s probably clear where I’m heading with this…the answer is no.  Respect is far more than a term in a mission statement or something taught in a Management 101 class.  It’s recognizing that communication happens top-to-bottom, bottom-to-top, and side-to-side.  It’s understanding that collaboration means working together on difficult issues, appreciating the impact major decisions will have on employees, and offering real, viable options that truly demonstrate that every employee is valuable and, you got it, respected.

No…I don’t see anything about this decision that demonstrates respect.  Rather, whether it was Yahoo’s way to weed out non-performers or demonstrate that they can exercise control over their workforce, it’s pretty apparent – no matter your perspective on the decision itself – that “respect” for its employees was not even a discussion point during that meeting.

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