So…How Was Your Working Parents Day?

Just wondering…did this week’s recognition of Working Parents Day change your life in any way?  I’m not a betting person yet I’ll wager not.  Yesterday was likely the same as today and tomorrow will likely follow suit.

Here’s the thing…I’m all for bringing attention to causes.  Hell…I support many myself and applaud those who work tirelessly to raise awareness and generate support for anything that will help another person.  Or many other people.  But I do have a problem with a day coined “Working Parents Day” when the reality is that a day hardly does this cause justice.

I’ve said it before and will continue to say it — working parents have a herculean task that faces them at sunrise every day and doesn’t end until their weary bodies fall into bed at night.  And why do they do it?  Because they value their efforts and contributions at work as they hold dear their roles as Moms and Dads.  As they should.  And they shouldn’t have to choose.

Married or single parent.  One child or several.  Raising a middle schooler or guiding a college junior.  Family support or at the rodeo alone.  Self-employed or employee.  Each and every working parent deserves recognition that goes far beyond the day set aside to do so.  Instead of assigning a name to a day, why don’t we start to truly listen to working parents and do better at meeting their needs.

Many companies are definitely doing a great job of providing a multitude of supports and programs to help all their employees be productive, engaged, and healthy.  Yet many companies are still far behind the curve and even in those organizations where exceptional benefits are the norm, working parents continue to struggle.  And part of the reason is that their needs, for better or worse, are different.  And these differences mean different solutions.

We tend to take notice when a societal crisis hits and then scramble to try to figure out why it happened and what immediate solution can mitigate the seriousness of the situation.  It’s the reactive vs. proactive mode of operation, one that rarely succeeds.  And if we really take a minute to examine this crisis, it involves our children who require far more from their parents today — and I don’t mean more i-Phones or designer clothes — than ever before.  They need time.  Years ago it was latchkey kids.  Today it’s an explosion of afterschool programs to keep children involved vs. walking the streets.  But the buck begins and ends with parents and many are unable to stretch any farther.

So for those who created Working Parents Day, I say forget the day.  Instead, let’s take a look at how we can help the Dad who can’t get out of the office before 6:00 knowing his son’s softball games start at 4:30.  Or the Mom whose childcare provider continues to call in sick…at 7:00 when she leaves for work at 7:15.  These are real issues facing real people with real children depending upon them to find solutions.

If this day is celebrated next year, how about giving every working parent Working Parents Day off.  Now this would make a difference.

SIDE NOTE:  My blog is moving to our website — http://www.Education-Navigation.com — shortly so please visit me there.  I welcome your comments and more…

 

Hurray…It’s Working Parents Day

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been waiting all year for today.  One day dedicated to recognizing the people who “bring home the bacon, fry it up in a pan.”  Only this isn’t a line from an old TV commercial about women but a reality about *every* working parent.  The people who spend their days (or nights) generating an income for baby clothes, school supplies, dance lessons, pediatrician visits, braces, school trips, and the millions of other expenses that it takes to raise their children to adulthood.  And with adulthood coming later and later, often well *into* adulthood as well.

I don’t know about you, but Working Parents Day should be celebrated every day.  It isn’t enough and certainly minimizes the herculean job of working parents who are trying to balance – or as I prefer – integrate two competing roles and responsibilities.  They often say that unless you’re in it, you don’t get it, yet every working parent knows the juggling act required.  Some days work and others are nightmares.  Some days are all about putting out fires at work and at home.  Some days, a 10-minute bathroom break no matter where it may be is likely the only break possible until they fall into bed for a few hours of sleep before it starts all over again.

I don’t know about you, but working parents are the people in our society who deserve the kudos…and more.  They are keeping businesses in business while raising the next generation leading us into the future.  They’re meeting deadlines and making clients happy while making sure that their children are educated, safe, and have a decent breakfast every day.  No combination of jobs or roles is harder or more significant.

So while I don’t know about you, what I do know is that every working parent — married or single, white or blue collar, working days or night shift, raising children with or without special needs…every working parent deserves more than a day.  They deserve support, recognition, decent wages, flexible work hours, paid family leave, affordable child care, support for their child’s education, the ability to step off and step back, and genuine appreciation for a job well done each and every single day.

Business leaders need to stop and consider just where their businesses would be without working parents.  They need to recognize that some working parents need more flexibility and others need specific benefits.  They need to understand that working parents are working hard to be “top performers” yet sometimes the push/pull requires difficult choices.  And they should never forget that the child who needs Mom at home for two days due to the flu or the teen who wants Dad to visit colleges with them are the same people who will be filling the roles in their businesses tomorrow.  So hurray for Working Parents Day.  As far as I’m concerned, it’s 365 days a year.

SIDE NOTE:  My blog is moving to our website — http://www.Education-Navigation.com — shortly so please visit me there.  I welcome your comments and more…

 

Workshop For Dads – Autism and Special Education

Dads navigating through their children’s preschool through high school experiences have long been seen as the person who only attends an annual parent-teacher conference or appears at a school meeting when problems arise.  No longer.

Fathers are taking an active role in every phase of their children’s lives, and this is never more true than when their child has an autism spectrum diagnosis and is requiring special education services and supports in school.  The complexities of their children’s needs and the special education arena require dads to understand the basics and well beyond in order to truly be key players in the process.

“The Dad Dilemma: Your Child, Autism and Special Education” is a workshop for dads only being held in the Philadelphia area on June 26th and July 10th.  From understanding the language of special education to effective parent advocacy strategies, this interactive session will end the confusion that many dads feel and will replace it with information and actionable steps.  Dads should not have to struggle to “catch-up” to understand what’s happening with their children in school.

Information can be found at: http://www.education-navigation.com/fathersworkshop or by contacting us directly at 610-628-4456.

Autism Isn’t A Day Or Month

I’m a big supporter of raising awareness of causes and issues, encouraging people to rally to bring about change.  Yet when it comes to autism, a day or a month simply won’t suffice.

On various media outlets over the past few days, individuals have been sharing their insights into the realities of autism.  Some were identified as “experts” which, in my opinion, is a term that needs to be affixed carefully.  There was one – a mother – who spoke about raising her child with autism, sharing the realities with an emotional overlay that was as real as it gets.  This is the true expert.

Two of the other expert perspectives in particular stood out to me, each warranting a response and further discussion.  And while there may be those who might question from where I am gleaning my insights or upon what soapbox I’m standing, I’ll say that after spending 15+ years in the trenches in this arena both professionally and personally, I’ll take my chances.

One of the experts I’m referencing stated that parents need to push for services for their children.  Absolutely true.  Could not agree more nor cannot overemphasize the importance of parents taking charge in this regard.  Yet there was, and continues to be, a critical oversight here and one that is consistently overlooked.  It’s that parents need to learn *how* to push for services for their children, particularly in school where the lion’s share of these services need to be accessed.

There is an assumption, and a misplaced one at that, that parents automatically or miraculously acquire these skills … that somehow these skills simply appear after their child receives an autism spectrum diagnosis.  And this assumption even occurs with parents themselves who, in their jobs or professions, may have skills that they “assume” will transfer to parent advocacy and school interactions, but sadly do not.

Just like the social skills/social thinking that their children need to learn through direct instruction, parents also need to be taught how to navigate through the educational arena in order to secure the services that experts continue to state (and parents know) their children need.  And need now.  I often say that special education requires a master’s level of skills that continue to evolve over time.  Telling parents that they need to work hard over the long haul to get their children what they need is one thing.  Teaching them how to do so is another thing entirely.

The other expert on a different media outlet stated that as children reach high school, they need to learn life skills.  What?  As they reach high school?  Ever hear the expression “too little, too late?”  Here’s what’s wrong with this statement.

Part 1 — we first need to acknowledge that there’s a stigma attached to the phrase “life skills” so we need to rename it.  Parents (and others) equate it with things that, for many children on the autism spectrum including those with Asperger’s Syndrome, simply do not apply.  But there’s another huge bucket of life skills that they most definitely *do* need to learn (and be taught) in order to have any hope of successfully transitioning after high school graduation into college, employment, or independent living.  Once we eliminate the barriers created by the words “life skills” and broaden what it means, we can then begin to ensure that these skills are taught starting in preschool…and for all children.

Part 2 — when the teen reaches high school, it’s far too late to start thinking about the “life skills” they will need to transition into the adult world.  Even though transition planning is now supposed to begin at age 14, most schools pay little attention to the skills our children need to live as adults in the world.  We don’t start to teach reading when the child is 12 years old, so why would we wait until the child is a teen to begin teaching these critical skills?  Skills that are considered “life skills” need to hold equal weight with academic skills in terms of their importance.  And for some children, they’re even more important.  This isn’t an either/or scenario and parents should not be forced to choose (and this happens frequently) between helping their child improve their reading level or how to complete a job application or to live with a roommate in college.

The attention to autism this month and any month helps to raise the volume of discussion about a diagnosis impacting families, businesses, and our society.  And whether you believe the recent CDC stats or not, the reality is that there are millions of children and teens today with an autism spectrum diagnosis growing up to become part of our adult world.  As future employees, tomorrow’s college students, and the next generation of parents themselves.

Examining how we’re approaching autism is not an easy topic nor task, but real change is never easy.  What it does require is for us to honestly assess whether we’re providing parents with what they need to effectively help their children succeed in school and beyond.  And it also requires us to closely examine whether we’re truly doing what we need to do to help our children reach adulthood as prepared as possible.  This requires more than a day or month.  It requires a lifetime.

 

Permission Granted

Here’s how I see it…there are three types of people – those who ask for permission, those who don’t and just back away from whatever it is, and those who just do and deal with the consequences later.

The “typecasting” typically starts in childhood – e.g. asking to stay up past 9:00 or just doing it and dealing with the parental wrath later.  We were taught that the act of asking shows good manners and respect for the other person, and we teach the same to our kids as what parent doesn’t want their child to be considered well-mannered and respectful.  Yet here’s the thing … the “real lesson” is giving the *permission* to ask.  It’s the step that precedes “ask and ye shall receive” because if you don’t know it’s okay to ask, many simply don’t.

Believe it or not, there are millions of parents who are reluctant to ask their child’s teacher (or principal or IEP team members) the questions that fall into the “5W’s” category:  Who is bullying my son at lunch; what is being done to help my daughter develop her organizational skills; where is my child’s aide during transitions when problems are continuing to occur; when will we receive the data being collected; why is my son still reading well below grade level.  And we haven’t even touched on the “h” question – how are you going to help my child learn social skills or how is it that my child’s IEP goals are repeated from year to year.  All questions that parents *must* ask, yet far too many appear to be hindered by the asking process because they are waiting for permission to do so.

Some of the reluctance to ask comes from fear… of questioning the “experts”…of retaliation…of being labeled one of “those parents”.  Yet fear is not a good enough reason not to ask, and certainly not when your child is struggling in school.  Asking is the conduit to information and it is – or needs to become – an ongoing activity.  This is one area – and time – where parents need to stop worrying about how they’ll be perceived and start realizing that their job is to ask…and to keep asking.

So consider this the blanket “green light” to ask…for answers, information, explanations, data, reports…whatever it is that you need.  And if you’re not sure exactly what you need, ask for everything involving your child – records, work samples, charts…everything.  Because here’s the reality…I guarantee that when a parent walks out of a physician’s office after hearing their child has autism or a reading evaluator’s office with a diagnosis of dyslexia, one of the first “out-of-the-gate” responses (after possibly shock) is to ask…everything.   There’s no difference when it comes to school.

The only way a parent can truly become an advocate for their child and the “true expert” about what’s happening in school is to ask…and ask often.  And the path to asking begins with having the permission to do so.  Permission granted.

It’s All About Having Choices

Walk down the aisle of the supermarket and what do you see?  Choices.  More corn flakes, types of ice cream, and varieties of toilet paper than anyone needs.  Yet it’s there…choices.  The reasons (and this isn’t a marketing discussion) involve wanting to target and satisfy various preferences since not everyone eats whole wheat bread or wants shredded cheese.  So why all the fighting about education?

Listened to another discussion on MSNBC yesterday about public education.  Education Nation is one of their signature features and I applaud them (and everyone) who places education at the top of the list.  Yet what I seem to keep hearing is that public education is *the* way – that it’s the only type of education that deserves our attention, funding, and resources.  The hard work being done to turn the tide in our struggling public schools is no different than the work being done in charter or alternative schools.  Each are working to meet the education needs of our children, albeit differently.  So if “choice” defines our society, why is education any different?  What makes public education better than any other education option and, as importantly, shouldn’t the choices parents exercise in this regard receive equal attention – and respect – for the work they, too, are doing to educate our children?

I understand the premise of public education and indeed there are many districts, schools, and teachers doing a terrific job of educating our children in these settings.  But just like soy products and scented detergent aren’t right for everyone, the same applies to education.  School isn’t a one-size-fits-all issue and this certainly applies when we talk about, for example, the types of instruction and environment within which education occurs.  Children have different learning styles and function better in certain settings when their individual needs are met.  And in order to meet them, there have to be choices.  Otherwise, it’s the old “trying to fit a square peg in a round hole” adage still at work.

There are kids who thrive in large public schools yet there are others who find success in smaller charter schools.  There are parents who choose religious education for their children and others who would opt for private school if provided with this option.   Each option is worthy of our attention and support because if it was your child struggling in their current educational placement, wouldn’t you want viable choices to evaluate?  I know I did.  The point is that today, education is not one thing but rather a spectrum of options.  The days of school equating to all children attending their local public school are over.  And thankfully so.

If the goal is to satisfy the need for our children to learn and if the reality is that every child learns differently, choice must be part of the discussion.  And if the reality is that environment is a key factor to a child’s ability to learn, then it follows that having choices vs. assuming that public school – or any option – is *the* answer is the only way.  Thirty years ago, the choices available for parents in evaluating school options for their children were slim at best; today we have a range of options, making for a far richer “shopping” experience.

The bottom-line goal is to help ensure that every child has the opportunity to succeed in school.  And because we define success differently for everyone, we must define education similarly as well.  My support for education runs broad and deep in all its forms, yet I equally support the word that needs to follow it…choice.

 

The Roller Coaster Ride That Never Ends…

How many parents haven’t agreed to ride the roller coaster at least once with their kids?  It’s almost a “right of passage” – sitting for 3 minutes on a ride that you can’t wait to end.  Yet riding the roller coaster at an amusement park doesn’t come close to the other roller coaster ride – the one that parents can’t get off because it simply doesn’t end.

I can count on two hands the number of days school has been in session yet would need my hands and toes plus those of others to count some of what I’ve already been told…

  • My child’s teacher refuses to allow my son to have a midday snack even though it’s on his IEP and has been documented by medical need.
  • We explained that my daughter needs extra time to transition from class to class and it’s in her IEP, yet we’ve already received a note saying that she’s been late for class several times.
  • Even though my child’s IEP states that homework will be limited to 30 minutes per night, we’re already spending double that amount of time and behaviors are starting.

Yes..it’s the start of a new school year.  New backpacks.  New classmates.  And a host of new issues that often combine with those carried over from last year.  If your child is in special education, you know well that this ride is anything but short and you won’t be on solid ground for a while.

Added to the challenges that inherently accompany having a child with autism, ADD/ADHD, or a learning disability comes slashed budgets, larger class sizes particularly if your child is in a regular education classroom, and fewer resources.  Districts are stretched thin and so are teachers.  Yet the reality is that it’s the parents who are feeling the strain and the children are already showing it.

Every school year begins with the hope that it will be a good one.  That services will be provided, supports will be in place, compliance with IEPs will occur, and collaboration will be the approach.  And for many parents, this is indeed how this and every school year begins.  Yet for many others, it’s anything but.

A few things to ease the mounting pressure:

  • If your child is already showing signs that things are not working, reconvene your IEP team now.  It should be routine that, depending upon how your child is doing “out of the gate,” you convene in September or early October.  Remember that you can call an IEP meeting at any time so don’t wait.
  • If your child made progress or regressed over the summer, bring this information and data to your IEP team meeting.  It’s essential that everyone involved in teaching and supporting your child knows what has happened from June through September.
  • If your child has been evaluated or re-evaluated over the summer and you agree with the findings, provide a copy of this report to your district before heading into an IEP meeting.  You want to give them sufficient time to review the documentation so that you’re all on the “same page” during your discussions.

And the most important piece of guidance is this – your child is continually changing and as such, your child’s IEP may need to change as well.  If you developed this year’s IEP last year, think about the weeks and months that have passed in the meantime.  Things that may have appeared appropriate in March may well be different in September.

If you have not been keeping notes at home, do so.  Your observations and data factor into your child’s educational plan so be sure you’re watching, listening, and recording things as the school year unfolds.  Document all conversations with school district staff – no “off the cuff” discussions apply.

Your child’s greatest resource is you.  Pace yourself.  Be proactive.  Focus on collaboration.  And don’t be afraid to ask the tough questions or to bring in outside support if needed.   I read a great business quote that certainly applies here too — “What you want, you will get.  But you have to want it enough to go about getting it.”